Mid0nz: Sherlock's Danger Night

I'm mid0nz. This blog explores BBC Sherlock from a 44 year old Cumberdyke's perspective. Sometimes subject matter & the occasional reblog are NSFW. I'm obsessed with cinematography, the 221B set & props, and the soundtrack. Sometimes there are otters.

MOTTO: "Do I contradict myself? Very well, then I contradict myself. (I am large, I contain multitudes.)"
-Walt Whitman
Who I Follow
mid0nz:

Dark!Johnlock, a Do-it-Yourself Meta 

"Three times we tried to kill you and your companion, Mr. Holmes. What does it tell you when an assassin cannot shoot straight?”

Ship Shape
What meaning might we make from this transition in The Blind Banker?
Let’s break it down.
1) Sarah is bound, gagged, crying— clearly distressed as the sand seeps out of the bag.

2) Cut to John. He’s captive and dazed, sweating, beaten and bloody and nearly crying. He’s been mistaken for Sherlock. (The evidence is pretty damning. I mean how many men are that closely entwined?)

3) Cut to GAY PRIDE insert. Yes that’s the London Eye lit up for GAY PRIDE. (The soundtrack swells into a variation of the show’s theme.)

4) Cut to Sherlock in the cab checking his whereabouts and looking concerned. No, really. Look how concerned he is:

5) Now. What does Sherlock see in the next shot when he looks ahead out the cab’s windscreen?  Look closely. 

No! No! No!  I said CLOSELY.

That’s better. More rainbow.
You know my methods. What do you deduce?

originally posted 18 November 2013

mid0nz:

Dark!Johnlock, a Do-it-Yourself Meta 

"Three times we tried to kill you and your companion, Mr. Holmes. What does it tell you when an assassin cannot shoot straight?”

Ship Shape

What meaning might we make from this transition in The Blind Banker?

Let’s break it down.

1) Sarah is bound, gagged, crying— clearly distressed as the sand seeps out of the bag.

2) Cut to John. He’s captive and dazed, sweating, beaten and bloody and nearly crying. He’s been mistaken for Sherlock. (The evidence is pretty damning. I mean how many men are that closely entwined?)

3) Cut to GAY PRIDE insert. Yes that’s the London Eye lit up for GAY PRIDE. (The soundtrack swells into a variation of the show’s theme.)

4) Cut to Sherlock in the cab checking his whereabouts and looking concerned. No, really. Look how concerned he is:

5) Now. What does Sherlock see in the next shot when he looks ahead out the cab’s windscreen?  Look closely. 

No! No! No!  I said CLOSELY.

That’s better. More rainbow.

You know my methods. What do you deduce?

originally posted 18 November 2013

Women in Film from MovieScope Magazine March/April 2013

Top Row, Left to Right
Emily Greenwood Digital Online Editor 
Alice Lowe Writer/Actress, Sightseers 
Alison Small CEO,  The Production Guild of Great Britain 
Gale Anne Hurd Producer, The Terminator; The Walking Dead 
Katherine Oliver Commissioner, New York City Mayor’s Office of Media and Entertainment
Annemarie Jacir Writer/Director, When I Saw You 

Second Row, Left to Right
Anna Higgs Head, Film4′s Film4.0 
Dreama Walker Actress, Compliance
Yanika Waters Wardrobe & Costume Trainee 
Gemma Arterton Actress, Byzantium 
Amanda Nevill CEO, British Film Institute 
Ingrid Kopp Director of Digital Initiatives, Tribeca Film Institute 

Third Row, Left to Right
Francine Stock Critic & Presenter: BBC Radio 4′s The Film Programme 
Olivia Colman Actress, Broadchurch; Hyde Park on Hudson 
Nicola Lees Mentoring Scheme Producer 
Hanan Abdalla Writer/Director, In the Shadow of a Man 

Fourth Row, Left to Right 
Priyanka Chopra Actress, Barfi; Krrish 3 
Afarin Eghbal Director, The London Syndrome 
Madeline Di Nonno Executive Director, The Geena Davis Institute for Gender in Media 
Helen Jacey Script Consultant & Author, The Woman in the Story 

Fifth Row, Left to Right
Eve Hazelton DOP, Realm Pictures 
Len Rowles Producer, The London Syndrome 
Haifaa Al-Mansour Writer/Director, Wadjda 
Saskia Rosendahl Actress, Lore 
Kate Reid DOP, Blooded, Scrubber 
Judith Chan, Director in the Media Office, Coutts 

Bottom Row, Left to Right
Rosario Dawson Actress, Trance 
Cate Shortland Director, Lore
Rachel Millward Founder/Director Birds Eye View
Nicole Kidman Actress, Stoker 
Kate Kinninmont CEO, Women in Film and TV 
Ashanti OMkar Indian Cinema Expert, Writer and Broadcaster 

Hello seestras. Good to see you.

#Cloneplay at San Diego Comic-Con. 

OMG look at how many women it takes to cosplay Tatiana Maslany!!! Hear that? That is the sound of the Emmys being irrelevant. 

I want to do this thing real good like.

professorfangirl:

twostriptechnicolor:

Inspired by a conversation with Blondell-gazette, I did this thing.

What can I say, I’m a color geek.

What can I say, YOU’RE AWESOME.

Best. Thing. Ever.

mid0nz:

mid0nz:

workfornow:

mid0nz:

Why Delicious Needs the Sherlock Fandom
Why the Sherlock Fandom Needs Delicious

(Let me say first that I loved Delicious for many reasons which I’ll detail later in a full meta/review of the film.)

Please go download Delicious right now, and, even if you haven’t seen it, give it a positive (5 star) rating. I’ll explain why that high rating is important in a minute, but please go rate it now and then come back.

Now go watch the movie. (TW: Bulimia. It’s not an easy, light-hearted romp.) When you’re done, go back to iTunes or Amazon and review it with a generous spirit. Pretend you’re leaving comments on a fic writer’s first novel. 

In other words I’m asking you to fangirl over this movie, to treat it like it was created by one of your fandom friends. (In essence, it was.) It needs likes and reblogs and comments and in the movie world that means iTunes and Amazon high ratings and thoughtful, constructive reviews.

Delicious is not a Hollywood blockbuster; it’s a micro-budget indie film starring Louise Brealey (Molly Hooper from Sherlock). It’s Tammy Riley-Smith’s first feature-length film. She wrote, directed, and co-produced it. That’s right. A woman made a movie starring a woman. This almost never happens. I’m not exaggerating. 

Women comprised 6% of all directors working on the top 250 films of 2013. This represents a decrease of 3 percentage points from 2012 and 1998. Ninety-three percent (93%) of the films had no female directors.

Only 11% of all clearly identifiable protagonists are female (x) [see also (x) (x)]

11% of protagonists in the top 250 films are female. Let me repeat. Only a paltry 11 out of 100 protagonists in Hollywood blockbusters are female. So where are you going to see them (us)? Indie films, full stop. 

So Delicious needs YOU, the amazing Sherlock fandom, to give it a boost so that a wide audience can even get the chance to see it and make up their own minds about the content. Delicious needs YOU to rate the film highly so people who might need a nudge think— “oh— hey other people think it’s worth my time to see this flick. I’ll buy or rent it.” Delicious needs you to actually pay for it and not ever even THINK of pirating it. 

Delicious needs the Sherlock fandom. But why does the Sherlock fandom need Delicious?

Do you like Molly Hooper, the role Louise Brealey, a staunch feminist and the star of Delicious, plays on Sherlock? Do you like Molly’s spirit? You weren’t supposed to. Molly Hooper was a DEVICE before she met Loo Brealey:

[The character] that surprised both Mark and I…the one that took us by surprise and sort of lept up was Molly Hooper played by Loo Brealey who was really a one shot deal in the pilot just a device to indicate that Sherlock Holmes has no real interest in women and is a pretty cold and deadly sort of character. She was played to utter perfection by Loo Brealey and instantly Mark and I were sitting at the monitors going we’ve got to get her back and she’s REALLY hugely developed as a character. She’s never a massive presence in the episode but because of Loo’s wonderful performance she’s really cut through and she’s a real audience favorite and she’s really the one character that’s ours. The others are all from the canon. Molly’s ours. We didn’t expect to introduce that character. It just worked so that’s not a favorite [character] but the one we didn’t expect to love so much.” -Steven Moffat (x)

No, Moff, Molly’s not yours or Mark’s. She’s Loo’s. Without Loo’s talent and spirit Molly Hooper would have been a mere blip, just like most other women in film and television. 

Sherlock fandom, we owe Loo a HUGE thanks. You know what to do.

Not gonna endorse giving anything 5 stars sight unseen out of solidarity - but endorse everything else. How much money have you spent watching yet another perfectly fine movie without a single well-developed and interesting female character? Let alone a lead?

I respect reserving your rating until after you see it— I totally do. In theory we should only “endorse” what we’ve read, or seen ourselves. But I see this situation differently. Delicious is not getting a theater release so Amazon and iTunes ratings are IT. I see the whole Amazon/iTunes rating and review system not as a true indicator of the quality (whatever that means) of any film so much as they are votes— likes and reblogs if you will— that indicate that this film deserves you to stop scrolling and consider it. A micro-budget indie isn’t going to get the attention it deserves with, for example, a handful of stars and reviews.  

The iTunes algorithm that determines if a film gets featured is the life-blood of a movie like this. Just a few ratings and reviews got Delicious trending on iTunes UK— that’s all it took b/c the great majority of low-budget films that make it to iTunes get hardly any attention. So I’m all in— a film starring a woman I respect, about a complex female character, written and directed by a woman— well that’s a rare thing that deserves attention. I want to know about it, to watch it even if, in the end, I think (to my personal taste) that it’s a 1 star film. (In this case I think Delicious deserves the high rating.) 

Also getting it seen is the one way we can prove to all the assholes who said there is no audience for it b/c it’s a “woman’s film” wrong. It’s true. Distributors told the producers that nobody would go to see it. (That nobody cared b/c it starred a woman.) I’m serious. 

So I respect what you’re saying, and, in an ideal world, I’d agree, but I think this case— at least for me— warrants a solidarity click on the 5th star. 

Delicious ratings update 23 July 2014

Amazon UK - 6 reviews; 4 1/2 stars

iTunes UK- 50 ratings; 4 1/2 stars; 19 reviews; #5 Romance; #8 Indie; 

iTunes US - 70 ratings; 4 1/2 stars; 20 reviews; #16 Romance

iTunes Canada - 0 ratings; 0 reviews

See why a micro-budget indie might need to hit that Romance category to fly?

Also WTF CANADA? 

Delicious Behind the Scenes

With Nico Rogner (Jacques) and Louise Brealey (Stella). Directed by Tammy Riley-Smith (in black)

Here’s why you should give this micro-budget indie movie 5 stars and a review! Set fire to the 5th star!

More BTS photos!

multifandom-madnesss replied to your link “Sherlock Cinematography”

can anyone join? I’m not much on LJ so I’m not sure how this works… Very interested in Cinematography, though! (studying film, after all^^)

Yes— anybody can join but you need an LJ account. Once you’re logged into LJ click on this link.

Spit shine your gifs, Darlings! I made us a LJ community for discussing cinematography. Long form. Chit chat. Drafts of metas. Squee. Whatevs.

This is a refuge comm. No wankery.

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CRANE SHOT

A shot where the camera is placed on a crane or jib and moved up or down. Think a vertical tracking shot. (x)

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CROSS CUT

the editing technique of alternating, interweaving, or interspersing one narrative action (scene, sequence, or event) with another - usually in different locations or places, thus combining the two; this editing method suggests parallel action (that takes place simultaneously); often used to dramatically build tension and suspense in chase scenes, or to compare two different scenes; also known as inter-cutting or parallel editing. (x)

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DUTCH TILT

A shot where the camera is tilted on its side to create a kooky angle. Often used to suggest disorientation. (x)

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ESTABLISHING SHOT

The clue is in the name. A shot, at the head of the scene, that clearly shows the locale the action is set in. (x)

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FADE

a transitional device consisting of a gradual change in the intensity of an image or sound, such as from a normally-lit scene to darkness (fade outfade-to-black) or vice versa, from complete black to full exposure (fade in), or from silence to sound or vice versa; a ‘fade in’ is often at the beginning of a sequence, and a ‘fade out’ at the end of a sequence. (x)

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LAP DISSOLVE

a transitional editing technique between two sequences, shots or scenes, in which the visible image of one shot or scene is gradually replaced, superimposed or blended (by an overlapping fade out or fade in and dissolve) with the image from another shot or scene; often used to suggest the passage of time and to transform one scene to the next; lap dissolve is shorthand for ‘over’lap dissolve (x)

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LOW ANGLE 

A shot looking up at a character or subject often making them look bigger in the frame. It can make everyone look heroic and/or dominant. (x)

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MATCH CUT

Technical term for when a director cuts from one scene to a totally different one, but has objects in the two scenes “matched,” so that they occupy the same place in the shot’s frame. (x)

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MONEY SHOT

A shot that is expensive to shoot, but deemed worth it for its potential to wow, startle and generate interest. In pornography, it means something completely different. (x)

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OVER EXPOSED

refers to a film shot that has more light than normal, causing a blinding, washed-out, whitish, glaring effect; deliberately used for flashbacked or dream scenes; aka flared or bleached (x)

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OVER THE SHOULDER SHOT

In film, a shot that gives us a character’s point of view but that includes part of that character’s shoulder or the side of the head in the shot. (x)

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POINT OF VIEW (POV)

A shot that depicts the point of view of a character so that we see exactly what they see. (x) This is Redbeard’s POV on a Dutch tilt shot.

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RACK FOCUS

Watch how Lestrade, out of focus the entire scene, frames the action.  Ms. Wenceslas is in focus as she talks to him. Meanwhile Sherlock, also out of focus, is deducing and rolling his eyes. When Ms. Wenceslas turns toward Sherlock he comes in focus, turns away from her, and she fades out. She tosses the focus to Sherlock like a tennis ball.

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SLOW MOTION (SLO-MO)

refers to an effect resulting from running film through a camera at faster-than-normal speed (shooting faster than 24 frames per second), and then projecting it at standard speed; if a camera runs at 60 frames per second, and captures a one second-long event, a 24-frame playback will slow that event to two and a half seconds long;… this filmic technique is usually employed to fully capture a ‘moment in time’ or to produce a dramatic (or romantic feeling) (x)

We did [the slow motion shot of Cumberbatch] on a bungee 1000 fps on a Phantom camera. -Steve Lawes, Director of Photography (x)

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STEADYCAM

a hand-held camera technique using a stabilizing Steadicam (introduced in the late 70s), developed by inventor Garrett Brown, with a special, mechanical harness that allows the camera operator to take relatively smooth and steady shots, though hand-held, while moving along with the action (x)

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TOP SHOT

A shot looking directly down on a scene rather than at an angle. Also known as a Birds-Eye-View shot. (x)

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TRACKING SHOT

In such a film shot, the camera is literally running on a track and thus smoothly following the action being represented or perhaps thus giving the viewer a survey of a particular setting. (x)

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WIPE

a transitional technique or optical effect/device in which one shot appears to be “pushed off” or “wiped off” the screen by another shot replacing it and moving across the existing image (x)

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And a bonus wipe!

Dust is Eloquent (Sherlock & The Tractate Middoth)

From Each Frame Tells a Story: An Interview with Sherlock Cinematographer Steve Lawes

Mid0nz: One of the things which struck me-— which is strange-— but the dust scenes. The dust scenes at 221B when Mrs. Hudson opens the windows for the first time and then the dust in the library [in The Tractate Middoth]. Is that a trope that’s part of your bag of tricks? How did you approach the scenes differently? Because they’re very, very different kinds of moods.

Steve Lawes: Some Directors of Photography use a lot of atmos, a lot of smoke in the air so you see the shafts of light. I use it now and again. I tend to think of it as a bit theatrical a lot of the time. Obviously the point in Sherlock is that the room has been trapped for two years so you’re opening it up and it’s dusty. I am kind of fascinated by dust and the way it reacts with the light. I’ve spent some time shooting dust at high speed just on macros like dust particles floating around. You can watch them for hours. It’s like watching water moving around and it’s got such an organic motion to it. And again it’s that kind of detail that if you walked into that room for real, if it was a real room and the sun was really coming through and you moved the curtains and the dust then moved up into the air, the motes…you probably would look at them and you’d be noticing the fact that this dust is moving around.  On Tractate it was an idea that it was this… how do you tell that there is this thing there? How do you create this idea that there is this ethereal being there. You know, let’s chuck a load of dust in the air. (laughs)

Mid0nz: (laughing) It worked!

SL: Yeah! You’re experimenting but it’s like his [William Garrett, the lead character’s] friend says (in Tractate) “trick of the light.” This idea that something is different and there’s a smell. There’s a texture and it’s adding that something else that you can’t… I mean quite often a director will say to me “I want to make it feel different. How do I make it feel different?” And you go well we could shoot it from a different way, we could change the lighting, we do do this but quite often they’re drastic changes. Ideally what I try and look for is subtle changes that make the audience go-— there’s something different here. Obviously on something like Tractate you play up with it and you make a big deal of it. Again it’s just trying to tell the story, trying to tell the story visually, or helping tell the story visually. (x)

So this ^ happened on my dash. It comes from the ghost story The Tractate Middoth dir. by Mark Gatiss. 

I can spot Steve Lawes’s dust at 500 paces. 

(via greyrainylane)

superwholockianism:

What do you mean ‘it’s ridiculous’? ..I look pretty.

(via asolitarybee)

So I’ve got a long-form, in-depth interview coming up at the end of the week with Tammy Riley-Smith, the writer/director/co-producer of Delicious, the film. Send me your questions for her!

Here’s a list of what I have so far:

  1. If a film has a woman producer, can it get made without her being made to compromise on every damn thing?
  2. Is there such a thing as a specifically female “voice” in films written/directed by women, and if so, what characterizes it? 
  3. What is it like being a woman in a man’s world? Are there advantages of having a woman’s perspective as director, producer, writer?
  4. What’s your advice for a young woman who wants to succeed in the film business?
  5. What does she bring to this movie that another director wouldn’t have?
  6. At the première Tammy mentioned that she crossed the line in writing a particular scene and that the actors pulled her back. We were wondering what was in the script in the first place?
  7. Why did she choose to market Delicious as a foodie romance when Stella’s bulimia is so central?
  8. How do you write a movie where an e.d. is central that isn’t exploitive or oversimplifying?
  9. How are we supposed to read the ending?
  10. What does Riley-Smith hope bulimics take from her movie?
  11. Was this always Jacques’ story? Did you consider telling it from Stella’s perspective?
  12. In this telling, no tragic history is offered to justify Stella’s illness, which means it stands on its own as a problem to address, rather than a symptom. Did you hide the details of Stella’s past to avoid explaining it away?
  13. How do you keep the passion going between projects?
  14. The rating for the DVD in the UK is age 15+. Given that so many young women battle bulimia do you think the restriction is correct?
  15. Who are her favorite female directors?
  16. Who are the directors that no-one knows about but should?
  17. I would be interested to know how she decided how ambitious to be when she was securing funding. I’m in early stages of a feature length project and I could see us doing it for $25k, or $100k, or $250k. There’s a certain amount of what do you need to tell the story you want to tell. But there’s also the need to pay your investors back (hopefully). Do you aim big or go home? Do you aim for the least amount that could get it done? How should one approach that question?

Send me your questions!

(via mid0nz)