Sherlock's Danger Night

(And that’s just the 1/2 of it!)

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high-functioning-drama-queen:

no but can you imagine anderson and that one girl actually explaining their theories on screen? like

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Source high-functioning-drama-queen


Music to Picture: An Interview with Sherlock composer Michael Price

MJW: I was going to ask what his influences were, what kind of composer Sherlock is.

MP: Yeah, well I think it’s interesting because there’s a slightly off-center element to the tunes that Sherlock “writes”. His language is still tonal but I don’t know whether it’s got a hint of [Béla] Bartók in it or something like that. There’s a sense where it’s… Neither the “Woman” theme nor the “Waltz for John and Mary” are squared off at the edges. They’re sort of slightly unbalanced and so I think…. I don’t think there’s much to suggest that he would be either an arch-Modernist or a…. I think it’s interesting from the performances, particularly in the “Woman” episode [A Scandal in Belgravia], that there’s a sense, listening to Mrs. Hudson’s reaction and to John’s reaction, that the piece for Irene is sort of more romantic probably than they’ve heard Sherlock play before, which is why they all sort of go, “Ooh ah. You’re writing a piece for her.” So if I was going to guess, it would be a route through Bach, through Bartók, to Sherlock.

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I humbly submit to you my glorious head canon: Sherlock Holmes and Mycroft Holmes playing Bartók’s Romanian Folk DancesFor more info see this music meta.


Wonderful interview with Michael Price! Very interesting and insightful. Kudos for asking about subjects beyond Sherlock and beyond just music. <p>Speaking as a fellow violinist, Sherlock's always seemed kind of Paganini-esque, both in musical style and in temperament. idk. Love the discussion about Bartok!</p>

Anonymous

Thanks Anon!

I loved the part of our conversation where Michael Price revealed that as a composer Sherlock would have been influenced by Béla Bartók. It was a question that I’d hoped would lead me to an enlightening answer and I wasn’t disappointed.

Here’s what Michael said:

MJW: I was going to ask what his influences were, what kind of composer Sherlock is.

MP: Yeah, well I think it’s interesting because there’s a slightly off-center element to the tunes that Sherlock “writes”. His language is still tonal but I don’t know whether it’s got a hint of [Béla] Bartók in it or something like that. There’s a sense where it’s… Neither the “Woman” theme nor the “Waltz for John and Mary” are squared off at the edges.

They’re sort of slightly unbalanced and so I think…. I don’t think there’s much to suggest that he would be either an arch-Modernist or a…. I think it’s interesting from the performances, particularly in the “Woman” episode [A Scandal in Belgravia], that there’s a sense, listening to Mrs. Hudson’s reaction and to John’s reaction, that the piece for Irene is sort of more romantic probably than they’ve heard Sherlock play before, which is why they all sort of go, “Ooh ah. You’re writing a piece for her.” So if I was going to guess, it would be a route through Bach, through Bartók, to Sherlock.

So what does that mean for canon Sherlock? Because to my mind this is canon— we have his compositions— both of them— to study and they obviously reveal a lot about Sherlock’s character. But if you don’t have the musical background would you have come around to Michael’s conclusion? Probably not— and maybe not even if you did. 

"I don’t think there’s much to suggest that Sherlock is an arch-Modernist…” and “his language is still tonal" go together. MP’s saying that Sherlock wouldn’t be an atonal composer. So he wouldn’t be in the same camp as the influential 20th century Viennese School composers such as Arnold Schoenberg. (Here’s my favorite recording of a Schoenberg piece.) To put it crudely it doesn’t really sound like “music” as most of us think of it. (Here is a great video where Glenn Gould, an admirer of Schoenberg chats with Yehudi Menuhin, who was not a lover, debate Schoenberg’s music.) So I’d say that Sherlock would have known Schoenberg and not have been interested in emulating him. So SH isn’t anti-tonality. But, as a composer, he’s not entirely in the tonal world either. His work isn’t “squared off at the edges.” It doesn’t resolve in expected ways (that’s why it takes awhile to become accustomed to “John and Mary’s Waltz”). So…probably, Michael thinks— Sherlock’s influenced by Béla Bartók.

What does THAT mean?

Bartók’s music reflects two trends that dramatically changed the sound of music in the 20th century: the breakdown of the diatonic system of harmony that had served composers for the previous two hundred years (Griffiths 1978, 7); and the revival of nationalism as a source for musical inspiration, a trend that began with Mikhail Glinka and Antonín Dvořák in the last half of the 19th century (Einstein 1947, 332). In his search for new forms of tonality, Bartók turned to Hungarian folk music, as well as to other folk music of the Carpathian Basin and even of Algeria and Turkey; in so doing he became influential in that stream of modernism which exploited indigenous music and techniques (Botstein [n.d.], §6). (x)

That means that Sherlock’s “Hero Theme” (“The Game is On”) is notated with the instruction that the strings should play it “with gypsy flair”— as it owes a bit of debt to Romani folk music. (Note: the term “gypsy” is considered a slur.) 

Now let’s consider some other Romani folk music— music that Bartók lifted— Transylvanian/Romanian folk dances:

The melody of the first movements, according to Bartók, came from Mezőszabad, in the Maros-Torda (now Mureș County) section of Transylvania, and he first heard it when two gypsy violinists were playing it. (x)

Listen to Bartok’s Romanian Folk Dances for piano and violin. Tell me you can’t see Mycroft and Sherlock playing it! 

Note that Hans Zimmer felt the same way about what music was appropriate for Holmes’s spirit and used Romani-influenced music and Romani musicians for the Ritchie Holmes movies.

As to the Paganini— definitely NOT Sherlock Holmes— at least ACD Holmes or Beeblock or Ritchielock. Paganini was a virtuoso and wrote fracking difficult pieces to play. Amateurs don’t do Paganini. 

All that said, my fave AU Sherlock is eldritchhorrors’s. Her masterpiece, The Cold Song, features a Sherlock who is a music aficionado and can play quite well— he’s not a genius violinist, but he’s certainly accomplished— well beyond ACD, Beeblock or Ritchielock. Did I say masterpiece? I mean it. 

Here is a Bartók waltz, btw. 

Phew!


Sherlock (BBC), 'The evil shipper league' di casty (Cap 1)

I have to thank the wonderful casty for writing this fic in which I am an evil shipper villain!! Grazie cara! I’m really honored!  Now off I go to my Italiano dictionary… 

Big hug!!!


Here is the head canon and here is the porny thing. Is this a thing now? I hope this is a thing now. 

EDIT -> and here’s another!  so beautiful! 2 porny things makes it a thing. I have decreed!


Weighing in on your interview (from a long-time copy editor's perspective): It's brilliant. It's intelligent, comprehensive, with a demonstrated knowledge of and appreciation for your subject matter. If everyone who ever conducted interviews were this prepared going in and respectful throughout, few in the public eye would ever feel the need to shy away from an interview! The addition of links to definitions of specific terminology also is appreciated! I look forward to more of your work!

batik96

Thank you! But seriously, can I keep you?


Why did you ask about Johnlock? Just to hear him go "Yea. no" for satisfaction? He wouldn't be able to talk about it anyway. Just...why? Why was that necessary? Just to get the denial or evasiveness as proof how its not real? I don't understand why you asked him. Thats like a golden rule of this fandom...you don't ask the cast/crew about johnlock >_____<

Anonymous

Let me start off by saying that I’m 43 years old and I suspect that Michael is at least my age, probably older. So, we’re all adults here, ok?

Secondly I ship Johnlock like a UPS truck.

Thirdly, there’s nothing to be ashamed of. There is NOTHING to be ashamed of for shipping Johnlock. But that’s not what our conversation was about. 

If you read the interview you’ll see that I was asking about the fact that Irene’s motif, which he himself says is a very romantic theme, has the same musical structure as John’s, and Sherlock’s themes. I told him where I was headed with the question— he knew what I was getting at. He wasn’t at all upset or even surprised. I was asking him about the semantic power of music. Can the same structure be romantic in one theme and not in another? And believe it or not HE ANSWERED THE QUESTION. He didn’t deny anything and he wasn’t evasive. He was direct and open. Yes music can have semantic meaning. Yes it can be literal. (Inspector Morse) We don’t approach our composing that way— “we don’t strain to the gender politics of it too much.” Ultimately he said: And so we’re one of the departments that can happily hold our heads up and just go, “Yeah, no. We’re just playing what we’re seeing.”  What they see made them give Irene and John strikingly similar motifs. “Make of that what you will.” The laughing on his and my part was friendly. It wasn’t mocking in the slightest. 

Why did I ask? Because I wanted to know the answer. There is nothing whatsoever wrong with respectfully asking questions IN AN INTERVIEW because you want to know the answer. 


You don't need to publish this, but I want you to know that I think there's something wrong with a fandom that rewards a drawing of Sherlock and John making out (which is important, too! Don't get me wrong.) with thousands and thousands of likes and reblogs while something like your interview is brushed aside as an also-ran. Sorry, I'm just so disappointed. This is something huge, something important, how can people be so ignorant?

Anonymous

thebrownette:

mid0nz:

Aw I don’t begrudge anybody likes and reblogs ESPECIALLY for Johnlock cause you know that’s my ship. Patience in all things. The interview will get its due. It’s hardly an also-ran— it’s been out less than 24 hours!  The world is bigger than tumblr.  Plus, it has already been read by all the best fans ;-)

BTW anybody want to translate it into your language? I’ll help!!!!!!

I generally flip through tumblr and plan on reading things later, personally :)

Precisely. Also it’s roughly the size of a small town’s telephone book! Patience in all things. I was teasing, btw, about all the best fans. It’s all good. I’m as proud of it as I can be and many, many of folks have appreciated the hell out of it and that’s amazingly satisfying for me.

Source mid0nz


You don't need to publish this, but I want you to know that I think there's something wrong with a fandom that rewards a drawing of Sherlock and John making out (which is important, too! Don't get me wrong.) with thousands and thousands of likes and reblogs while something like your interview is brushed aside as an also-ran. Sorry, I'm just so disappointed. This is something huge, something important, how can people be so ignorant?

Anonymous

Aw I don’t begrudge anybody likes and reblogs ESPECIALLY for Johnlock cause you know that’s my ship. Patience in all things. The interview will get its due. It’s hardly an also-ran— it’s been out less than 24 hours!  The world is bigger than tumblr.  Plus, it has already been read by all the best fans ;-)

BTW anybody want to translate it into your language? I’ll help!!!!!!


Thanks for doing this interview, it was really interesting. It's easy to see the work and research you put into your questions. Most entertainment journalists don't have the time or interest to ask good questions so I usually cringe at reading interviews. I know you don't get paid for these, but they are top notch.

beatlesinpinstripes

Why thank you mightily !

I did months of research for both (so far) of them. They reveal whole new ways of looking at the show and so many avenues for fandom to get creative with their insights. I’d like to think that in some small way they contribute possibilities to the fandom, possibly to fanon. I have a few metas about how they might in the thought-queue but I’ve been so bleeding busy I haven’t had time to write them out yet! Soon, soon.


Historical Dictionary of American Cinema
By Keith M. Booker


Music to Picture: An Interview with Sherlock composer Michael Price

Mid0nz: So I have to ask because there’s a huge amount of people in the fandom who think that Sherlock and John should be romantically involved&#8230;

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Music to Picture: An Interview with Sherlock composer Michael Price

Mid0nz: So I have to ask because there’s a huge amount of people in the fandom who think that Sherlock and John should be romantically involved…

[READ MORE]



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